Rhode Island author publishes free publication to educate children about North Atlantic right whales

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The publication is free for anyone to download and contains educational information focused on conservation efforts.

By: Tim Studebaker

Facebook: @TStudebakerABC6

Twitter: @TStudebakerABC6

Email: [email protected]

PROVIDENCE, RI (WLNE) – The North Atlantic right whale is an endangered species that lives in the waters off New England.

Keri Newman is an author and marine naturalist from Rhode Island. Newman says, “There are less than 350 of them, and scientists believe they will disappear within the next 20 years.”

Newman wants to send the message that the species needs our help.

Newman says, “They nearly died out in the early 1900s because they were over-hunted.”

The population is still in difficulty today. Newman wrote a series of children’s books on marine life and endangered whales to inspire knowledge on the subject.

Newman says, “I really wanted to inspire kids, because that’s where our hearts are really open. If I hadn’t seen sea life or grown up on the ocean as a kid, I never would have had the passion I have today.

One of her latest posts focuses squarely on the endangered North Atlantic right whale, and she’s making it available for free.

Newman says, “My end goal is really to conserve whales and sea life, and to inspire kids to do so. I just want to break down all the barriers.

Newman says some steps adults can take include keeping boats at least 500 yards from these whales, reducing speed and helping to prevent entanglement in fishing gear. In the meantime, she says it’s important for children to learn that we need to protect the ocean and its creatures.

Newman says, “They can get involved and start telling people, start telling their teachers, start telling their parents. They can write letters to members of their congress and to their state representatives.

To learn more about Keri Newman and view her posts, visit: https://www.twistedorca.com/

© WLNE-TV / ABC6 2022

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