Self-Publishing Opens Ocean of Opportunities for Aspiring Writers in Kerala – The New Indian Express

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Express press service

KOCHI: Coming out of the hall at the Delhi Civil Service Officers Institute on Thursday night, Jyothy Sreedhar beamed with pride, his eyes sparkling with delight. An assistant professor at Changanassery NSS Hindu College, Jyothy received the coveted Asian Literary Society Award for her poetry collection “Yes, You Are Audible”.

Debuting as an aspiring author in 2010, Jyothy gained a huge following on Facebook, which encouraged her to post her works. His first two books in Malayalam were published in 2020 and “Yes, You Are Audible”, his first book in English, was published in 2021.

“It’s a dream moment come true for me. I had approached many well-known publishers two years ago to get my books published, but the response was not encouraging. Then I decided to self-publish my work and Praveen Vaisakhan of Ivory Books has been supportive.

Self-publishing gives us the freedom to own our works and decide the content and title,” she said. Gone are the days when budding authors waited for the grace of publishing houses to have a literary work published. The blossoming of the self-publishing industry has opened up an ocean of opportunity. The trend has become a boon for fulfilled writers who spend sleepless nights jotting down their love, fear, pain, and emotions dreaming of getting it published and appreciated.

Self-publishing has taken Kerala’s publishing industry by storm and around 2,000 literary works are published in the state every year, which has helped a legion of young writers to establish themselves. However, the trend has sparked a debate in literary circles about the declining standard of literary works.

“There is nothing wrong with self-publishing. Let the readers judge the quality of the literary work. If the book is good, it will stand the test of time. Previously, young writers had to depend on publishers, but now they have the choice to self-publish. Social media also offers a good platform for budding writers. Publishing a literary work is a matter of freedom of expression and there is no need to discourage it,” said writer K Satchidanandan.

“Although there are criticisms of falling literary standards, self-publishing and print-on-demand are helping young writers establish themselves. Many good writers gain critical acclaim through social media, which helps them market their books. Majority of these writers are poets and the criticism of lack of clarity and standard is true to some degree,” said editor Praveen Vaisakhan.

A writer can get 100 to 250 copies printed by spending Rs 30,000 to Rs 50,000 and it is his responsibility to sell the book, said publisher and owner of CICC Book House, Jayachandran. “Many people use print-on-demand to gain recognition as an author. There are about 140 publishing houses in Kerala and many printing presses have also ventured into publishing to exploit this opportunity. The writers distribute the books to their friends and relatives and they are less concerned about royalty.

The Board of State Libraries organizes annual book parties in all districts and some publishers offer the opportunity to display these books in such parties,” he said. Most people in the publishing industry agree that self-publishing is lucrative if the author has a good following. It’s undoubtedly a great way for budding writers to connect with readers.

KOCHI: Coming out of the hall at the Delhi Civil Service Officers Institute on Thursday night, Jyothy Sreedhar beamed with pride, his eyes sparkling with delight. An assistant professor at Changanassery NSS Hindu College, Jyothy received the coveted Asian Literary Society Award for her poetry collection “Yes, You Are Audible”. Debuting as an aspiring author in 2010, Jyothy gained a huge following on Facebook, which encouraged her to post her works. His first two books in Malayalam were published in 2020 and ‘Yes, You Are Audible’, his first book in English, was published in 2021. “It’s a dream come true moment for me. I had approached many well-known publishers two years ago to get my books published, but the response was not encouraging. Then I decided to self-publish my work and Praveen Vaisakhan from Ivory Books gave me support. Self-publishing gives us the freedom to own our works and decide the content and title,” she said. Gone are the days when budding authors waited for the grace of publishing houses to have a literary work published. The blossoming of the self-publishing industry has opened up an ocean of opportunity. The trend has become a boon for fulfilled writers who spend sleepless nights jotting down their love, fear, pain, and emotions dreaming of getting it published and appreciated. Self-publishing has taken Kerala’s publishing industry by storm and around 2,000 literary works are published in the state every year, which has helped a legion of young writers to establish themselves. However, the trend has sparked a debate in literary circles about the declining standard of literary works. “There is nothing wrong with self-publishing. Let the readers judge the quality of the literary work. If the book is good, it will stand the test of time. Previously, young writers had to depend on publishers, but now they have the choice to self-publish. Social media also offers a good platform for budding writers. Publishing a literary work is a matter of freedom of expression and there is no need to discourage it,” said writer K Satchidanandan. “Although there are criticisms of falling literary standards, self-publishing and print-on-demand are helping young writers establish themselves. Many good writers gain critical acclaim through social media, which helps them market their books. Majority of these writers are poets and the criticism of lack of clarity and standard is true to some degree,” said editor Praveen Vaisakhan. A writer can get 100 to 250 copies printed by spending Rs 30,000 to Rs 50,000 and it is his responsibility to sell the book, said publisher and owner of CICC Book House, Jayachandran. “Many people use print-on-demand to gain recognition as an author. There are about 140 publishing houses in Kerala and many printing presses have also ventured into publishing to exploit this opportunity. The writers distribute the books to their friends and relatives and they are less concerned about royalty. The Board of State Libraries organizes annual book parties in all districts and some publishers offer the opportunity to display these books in such parties,” he said. Most people in the publishing industry agree that self-publishing is lucrative if the author has a good following. It’s undoubtedly a great way for budding writers to connect with readers.

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